Inside your Miroku M500 shotgun

Since I had to remove the stock of my Miroku M500 20-bore for repairs, I thought I would take a few photos while everything was exposed.

Safety ON. Vertical post impinges on raised sections of trigger bars so triggers can't be pulled.

Safety ON. Vertical post impinges on raised sections of trigger bars so triggers can’t be pulled.

Safety OFF. Vertical post now in front of raised sections of trigger bars which can be lifted and triggers can be pulled.

Safety OFF. Vertical post now in front of raised sections of trigger bars which can be lifted and triggers can be pulled.

Two large screw heads under top bar of action. The further screw holds the V spring for the top lever. The closer screw sits in an elongated slot which allows the safety mechanism to move fore/aft.

Two large screw heads under top bar of action. The further screw holds the V spring for the top lever. The closer screw sits in an elongated slot which allows the safety mechanism to move fore/aft.

General view of action. Shadowed slot under the left side plate houses L the internal hammer. (These aren't 'side plates' according to the strict definition but it's a useful term under the circumstances).

General view of action. Shadowed slot under the left side plate houses the left striker (internal hammer).  These aren’t ‘side plates’ according to the strict definition but it’s a useful term under the circumstances.

L hammer (in fired position) under L side plate. Surprisingly, the total forward movement of the head of the internal hammer on firing is no more than 1cm (2/5th of an inch).

Left striker (in fired position) under left side plate. Surprisingly, the total forward movement of the head of the internal hammer on firing is no more than 1cm (2/5th of an inch).

L hammer in cocked position.

Left striker in cocked position.

Both hammers in cocked position

Both strikers in cocked position

Lighter coloured horizontal oblong at rear of action is the back of the Purdey locking bolt which moves to the rear when the top lever is pushed to the right.

Lighter coloured horizontal oblong at rear of action is the back of the Purdey locking bolt which moves to the rear when the top lever is pushed to the right.

Threaded hole in the very rear of the frame accepts the long bolt which hold the stock in place. The bearing surface around the threaded hole is very small. If you drop your shotgun, as I did, there is every chance that the metal surface will push back into the head of the stock, forcing the 'wings' apart, cracking the wood.

Threaded hole in the very rear of the frame accepts the long bolt which hold the stock in place. The bearing surface around the threaded hole is very small. If you drop your shotgun, as I did, there is every chance that the metal surface will push back into the head of the stock, forcing the ‘wings’ apart, cracking the wood.

Brown colouration inside the action isn’t rust, it’s red dust from the inside of the stock trapped in lubricant.

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About Nigel

Retired law firm project manager based in Jersey, British Channel Islands. When he isn't shooting clay pigeons, he's polishing his collection of kukris or digging his vegetable patch.
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6 Responses to Inside your Miroku M500 shotgun

  1. JAMES ENYEART says:

    you were looking for dates etc on the Miroku 500 SxS, I have one that I bought in Houston,TX in 1965 and the serial number is 226313, 28″ barrels double triggers, 12 ga.
    Wonderful gun and by last two shots around 20+ years ago downed two doves flying in different direction.

  2. Gary says:

    I guess you took down the Miroku database, but here’s mine…

    Miroku branded 500, 12 gauge SN 19043x, with 26″ barrels choked improved and modified. The gun is in 90+ % condition and as typical for them the wood is beautiful.

  3. Chad Prince says:

    Is there any way you could talk me through removing the butt stock? I have this same gun and can not figure out how to remove the stock.

    • Nigel says:

      Hi Chad. It’s very straightforward but, before starting, make sure your screwdriver is a good fit when removing the first screw – you don’t want to accidentally scratch the metalwork. If necessary, file down a slightly oversize screwdriver to fit. First, remove the screw in the lower tang, behind the trigger guard. Second, unscrew the two screws which secure the butt pad and remove the butt pad. This exposes a large cavity in the stock. Using a long screwdriver, unscrew the bolt at the bottom of the cavity. This will allow you to remove the stock. Reassembly is the opposite of the above. Nigel.

  4. Sam says:

    Does anyone know where a complete forearm can be purchased for one of thes miroku? It looks similar to this but is a model L11 or Lll. Thanks for your help

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