Nice kukri, interesting owner

I was kindly donated a kukri which belonged to Edward Henry Le Brocq, Chief of Police in Jersey, Channel Islands, in the 1950s.  Prior to service in Jersey, Le Brocq was a senior member of the (pre-independence) Indian Police Service.

The India Office and Burma Office List for 1945 mentions “LE BROCQ, EDWARD HENRY, Indian Police (supt., Bengal) (b. 25th May 1903). – Joined the service as asst. supt., Bengal, 6th Jan 1923″.

The Calcutta Gazette dated June 4th 1924 lists the postings of probationary Assistant Superintendents following completion of their training, with Edward Le Brocq going to Hooghly, West Bengal.

Calcutta Gazette, June 4th 1924

Calcutta Gazette, June 4th 1924


Le Brocq was trained at the Police College, Sardah (now the Bangladesh Police Academy) and went on to be Principal of the College from 1939-1943.

Indian Police Academy,  1922-3

Indian Police Academy, 1922-3 (Le Brocq is rear row, 3rd from right)

The LONDON GAZETTE dated 1st January 1948 reports his award of the OBE whilst Deputy Inspector-General of Police, Bakarganj Range, Bengal. (Bakarganj is a former district of British India now located mostly in Bangladesh).

Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Edward Henry LE BROCQ

For those not familiar with the island of Jersey, we are a Crown Dependency situated just off the French coast, British, but independent of the English parliament, and with our own legislature and laws. We have two kinds of police: the Honorary Police, believed to have been formed in 1331 (no, that’s not a typo), and the “Paid” police formed in 1853 and formalised as the States Of Jersey Police in 1952 with Le Brocq as its Chief Officer.  
My friend, the donor of the kukri, remembers it sitting on his uncle’s desk in a light-coloured leather sheath; sadly, that sheath is now lost, and its replacement is a poor fit.

Given the quality of the kukri I suspect that it was a presentation item when Le Brocq left the Police College in 1943 or when he left India.  The fittings are nickel silver and the general workmanship is excellent. At some point the blade has suffered damage and has been re-ground, losing part of the belly.

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

Kukri presented to Edward Henry LE BROCQ

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About Nigel

Retired law firm project manager based in Jersey, British Channel Islands. When he isn't shooting clay pigeons, he's polishing his collection of kukris or digging his vegetable patch.
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