Vintage .410 ammo

The club ammo store has just been reorganised and guess what was found in the process?

Vintage .410 ammo

Vintage .410 ammo

Since they first appeared in modern form in the mid-1870s, .410 cartridges have been made in three lengths: 2″, 2½” and 3″. Shorter cartridges can be fired in guns chambered for longer versions, but not vice-versa.The first and third boxes are 2½” (so-called ‘Fourlong’) cartridges which would fit my 2½”-chambered Ugartechea side-by-side.

uggie

George Kynoch started manufacturing percussion caps at Witton, Birmingham, in 1862, and expanded to an ammunition factory in Essex in 1897.  Kynoch Limited merged with Nobel Industries, acquired Eley Brothers (another ammunition manufacturer) and were known jointly as Nobel Explosives.  The latter merged with three other companies to form ICI in 1927.

L to R: .410, 20-bore, 12-bore, 10-bore & 4-bore.

L to R: .410, 20-bore, 12-bore, 10-bore & 4-bore.

ICI acquired Yorkshire Imperial Metals and, in 1962, a century after George Kynoch set up in business, the name Imperial Metal Industries (“IMI”) was adopted.  I’m not sure when the name ICI stopped being used on ammunition, but these three boxes of cartridges are definitely not ‘factory fresh’ and I don’t think I’ll be using them!  The names Kynoch and Eley are still respected trade names in the ammunition business, however.

If you have enjoyed this post, please drop me a note or subscribe to this blog using the Subscribe function on the Home Page. Thanks!

About Nigel

Retired law firm project manager based in Jersey, British Channel Islands. When he isn't shooting clay pigeons, he's polishing his collection of kukris or digging his vegetable patch.
This entry was posted in Firearms, Shotguns and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *